‘Students have outstanding attitudes to learning,
which is primarily as a result of good teaching and very positive relationships across the whole academy.’ Ofsted
‘Students behave very well, show high levels of cooperation, respect and courtesy and work highly effectively with each other and their teachers. This creates a very positive learning environment.’ Ofsted
The Langley Academy | Gifted & Talented

In 3 place.

In 2 place.

THE WINNING VIDEO.

 

Brilliant Club – Reading Challenge

THE CHALLENGE:
In Term 2, students in the year 8 Brilliant club were challenged to read a book in small groups and record a video reviewing that book. Students had to be creative in how they did the review and were also encouraged to have fun with it. They were given the choice of a book from the list attached below. The videos produced were amazing and choosing a winner was very difficult, but after much deliberation the winners are as follows:

Gifted & Talented

At TLA, we are committed to providing every student with opportunities to develop his or her maximum potential and to provide high quality learning. All of our students are entitled to a curriculum and environment which meets their needs and enables them to flourish both academically and in terms of developing their character.


What is the difference between ‘Gifted’ and ‘Talented’?

‘Gifted’ is defined as being exceptionally able in academic subjects, such as English, Maths, Science, History or Geography. ‘Talented’ is defined as being exceptionally skilled in practical subjects such as Music, PE and Drama. Gifted and talented students may demonstrate high achievement in only one subject or high ability across all subjects.  There may be students who are high achievers but lack social skills or have a short concentration span.  There may be those who have the potential but not the motivation to achieve at a high level.  Others may have very good oral skills but poor writing skills.  And yet others may find ways to disguise their abilities.  Teachers are aware of these possibilities and use appropriate methods to identify gifted and talented students.


How are Gifted and Talented Students identified?

Initial identification for the whole school list is based on KS2 data and information sent from primary schools. From then on, Gifted and Talented students can be identified at any time throughout the school year. To be eligible for the whole school list, your son or daughter must be in the top 5% nationally at KS2 or be nominated by the teaching, pastoral staff, peers and parents for their outstanding performance.


Challenging the most able

Strategies that might be used…

  • Change the pace, resources, support, questioning, outcome and role.
  • The opportunity to work at higher cognitive levels using HOT tasks.
  • Provide appropriate, challenging feedback.
  • The opportunity to investigate real life situations, to solve real problems and produce real solutions.
  • Regular monitoring and reporting, to the G&T coordinator, of individual student performance.
  • Opportunities for more able students to work together

In addition to the whole school list, each department is asked to draw up a subject specific set of criteria to identify Gifted and Talented students in their particular area. This subject specific identification enables staff to target students for appropriately stretching work and opportunities. 

How will I know if my child is on the list?

Your child will be invited to attend one or several Gifted and Talented events by letter at some stage throughout the school year. This may indicate their presence on the list however, it must be noted that this invitation does not confirm their place throughout their time at TLA. The list is being updated termly based on academic and relevant performance. A child can be placed back on the list at any time. This fluidity ensures the school is delivering the Gifted and Talented programme to the appropriate students at any given time.


How does the school provide for Gifted and Talented Students?

There is a range of provision including more challenging activities within the classroom and extra- curricular activities. Outside of the classroom these can include puzzle days, attending lessons to observe the next key stage, go on trips, mentoring students lower down the school, listening to visiting speakers, competitions and challenges.